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As you read this article, more than likely on your phone, see tablet, medicine or computer take a moment to notice your posture. There’s a good chance that your back is hunched, your head is tilted forward and your shoulders are rounded. When school season starts many students from grade school to university will be spending a large portion of their day looking at a screen as they text friends, read e-books and write essays. Office workers are also very prone to the same stresses as they are stuck looking at their monitor all day. Be sure to keep an eye on your posture during these activities. Your back and neck will thank you.

Text-Neck-Back-to-School-Infographic-Aug16

Did you know that bending your head to look at your phone can put up to 60 pounds of pressure on your spine? A 2014 study in Surgical Technology International showed that even a 15-degree head tilt adds 27 pounds of pressure. As we use our phones and laptops more and more, that stress adds up!

Hand-held devices aren’t going anywhere soon — they’re useful and convenient. As you tap and swipe, follow these tips to avoid the aches and pains that come with the digital age.

 


Take a break

Holding up your phone or tablet for extended periods of time can strain the muscles in your shoulders, arms and fingers. Let your arms rest at your sides every so often.

The 20-20-20 rule

Give your eyes a break! Every 20 minutes, take 20 seconds to look about 20 feet ahead (or as far as possible).

Change positions

Next time you’re thinking of pulling an all-nighter, try to avoid sitting for longer than 30 minutes at a time. Get up and walk around!

Aim higher

Raise your phone up closer to eye level to reduce strain on your neck. When watching lectures on your tablet or laptop, be sure to prop it up against something so your shoulders and arms can relax.

Stretch it out

Slowly turn your head towards your left shoulder, hold for five seconds and repeat on your right side. You can also download Straighten Up Canada! — a free app developed by Canada’s chiropractors with videos of stretches you can do to help your posture in just three minutes!


The only thing that’s more important than “perfect” posture is movement. If you still have pain and discomfort after trying these tips, visit a chiropractor to develop a plan to keep you pain-free in the classroom or in the office

 Courtesy of the Ontario Chiropractic Association

As you read this article, salve more than likely on your phone, tablet, or computer take a moment to notice your posture. There’s a good chance that your back is hunched, your head is tilted forward and your shoulders are rounded. When school season starts many students from grade school to university will be spending a large portion of their day looking at a screen as they text friends, read e-books and write essays. Office workers are also very prone to the same stresses as they are stuck looking at their monitor all day. Be sure to keep an eye on your posture during these activities. Your back and neck will thank you.

Text-Neck-Back-to-School-Infographic-Aug16

Did you know that bending your head to look at your phone can put up to 60 pounds of pressure on your spine? A 2014 study in Surgical Technology International showed that even a 15-degree head tilt adds 27 pounds of pressure. As we use our phones and laptops more and more, that stress adds up!

Hand-held devices aren’t going anywhere soon — they’re useful and convenient. As you tap and swipe, follow these tips to avoid the aches and pains that come with the digital age.

 


Take a break

Holding up your phone or tablet for extended periods of time can strain the muscles in your shoulders, arms and fingers. Let your arms rest at your sides every so often.

The 20-20-20 rule

Give your eyes a break! Every 20 minutes, take 20 seconds to look about 20 feet ahead (or as far as possible).

Change positions

Next time you’re thinking of pulling an all-nighter, try to avoid sitting for longer than 30 minutes at a time. Get up and walk around!

Aim higher

Raise your phone up closer to eye level to reduce strain on your neck. When watching lectures on your tablet or laptop, be sure to prop it up against something so your shoulders and arms can relax.

Stretch it out

Slowly turn your head towards your left shoulder, hold for five seconds and repeat on your right side. You can also download Straighten Up Canada! — a free app developed by Canada’s chiropractors with videos of stretches you can do to help your posture in just three minutes!


The only thing that’s more important than “perfect” posture is movement. If you still have pain and discomfort after trying these tips, visit a chiropractor to develop a plan to keep you pain-free in the classroom or in the office

 Courtesy of the Ontario Chiropractic Association

Dr. Mark Tran, here HBSc, DC is a chiropractor practicing in Uptown Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.  Practicing diversified chiropractic techniques, active release techniques, acupunture and kinesiology (kinesio) taping for low back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, joint pain, muscle pain, musculosketetal pain, headache, injury or injuries, repeitive strain injury, sprain, strain

http://www.drmarktran.com

 

chiropractic, low back pain
As a forth generation dog person, viagra I am privileged to carry on a family, there and personal passion. Born and raised in the dog show environment, I have been involved with dogs to some degree all my life, breeding and exhibiting Miniature and Standard Poodles, and Whippets.

I have been a member of the Canadian Kennel Club since 1983 when I registered my first litter of Miniature Poodles. I enjoy my participation within the dog community, exhibiting, stewarding, and where ever opportunities present themselves. In 2010 I submitted my application for my CKC judging license and am currently licenses for all of Group Six, and on permit for half of Group 5.

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